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and learn to run 





TIME IT WAS; 

OH, WHAT A TIME IT WAS, 

IT WAS . . . 

OH, WHAT A TIME IT WAS. 

A TIME OF INNOCENCE, 

A TIME OF CONFIDENCES 

LONG AGO, 

IT MUST BE; 

I HAVE A PHOTOGRAPH, 

PRESERVE YOUR MEMORIES, 

THERE ALL THAT'S LEFT YOU. 





(P.Simon) 





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VV\ 






1' I ,ii . 



Robert O'Day 

Senior Grade AdministratI 

Brown University 






Dorothy Gallo 

Sophomore Grade Administrator 

Radcliffe 




Richard Lawrence 

Junior Grade Administrator 

Nova University 







Charles Vickery 

Principal 

Boston College 
Boston UniversilN 
Nova University 



Administration 

and 

Faculty 












Paul Abrahamson 


Sal Bartolotti 


Social Studies 


Music 


Boston University 


New England Conservatory of Music 


Sue Ajemian 


Gordon Bates 


Home Economics 


Science 


University of Rhode Island 






Marie Benard 


Philip Anderson 


English 


English 


Emmanuel College 


Tufts College 






James Berlenbach 


Harwood Bailey 


English — Drama 


Social Studies 


Bridgewater State College 


Steven Baisden 


Susan Big 


Math 


Spanish 


Boston College 


University of Madrid 





12 



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Curt Boyden 
Industrial Arts 
Bridgewater State College 

Christopher Brown 

Art 

Colby College 

Ruth Butterfield 
Social Studies 
Boston University 

Richard Caldwell 

Science 

Boston University 

Margaret Condito 
Secretary — Guidance 



Mary Connelly 
Secretary — Guidance 

Edmond Connors 
Physical Education 
Boston University 

Denver Deeter 

Math 

Eastern Nazarine College 

George Degrasse 
Guidance 
Cole College 

John Denney 
Science 











13 



% 











Catherine Devine 

Business 

Boston Teacher's College 

Charles Dirk 

Science 

Brown University 

Frank Downing 

Art 

Mass. College of Art 

Joan Dufault 

History 

Villanova University 

Alan Edmond 

Math 

Assumption College 



George Edmonds 

Math 

Wesleyan University 

Charles Finn 
Spanish 
University of Mass. 

KAREN Glasser 

Math 

Simmons College 

Angela Epple 

English 

University of Michigan 

Mark Garth 

French 

Purdue University 





^j¥'0^!S: 



14 





Ronald Goba 
English 
Boston College 

Meridith Gordon 
Physical Education 
Springfield College 

Nancy Gustafson 
Guidance 
Tufts University 

Virginia Hansel 

Business 

Boston University 

James Haviland 

English 

Tufts University 



John Hennelly 
English 
Boston College 

Doug Holley 

Math 

Harvard 

Edith Howard 
Social Studies 
Radcliffe College 

Betty Howlett 

Sec. — Grade Administrator 

Colby Junior College 

Richard Jenson 
Social Studies 
Wesleyan University 











15 







1 






I 




1 





Fred Jewett 
English 
Boston College 

Maynard Johnson 
Industrial Arts 
Bridgewater State College 

Janet Jordon 
Physical Education 
Westchester State College 

James Kane 

Industrial Arts 

Indiana Institute of Technology 

Muriel Kendall 
Special Needs 
Bridgewater State College 



John Kennedy 
Physical Education 
Boston University 

James Kirkcaldy 

Social Studies 

University of Rhode Island 

Elaine Kline 
Sec. Principal 

David Lacatell 
Social Studies 
Northeastern University 




16 





Thomas Lane 

Art 

Museum of Fine Arts School 

Lawrence Leahy 

Business 

Suffolk University 

Claudia Leone 

Math 

Clarkson College of Technology 

Peter Lincoln 
Science 
Boston College 

Suzanne Lincoln 
Home Economics 
University of Rhode Island 



Craig Low 

Math 

Boston State College 

Robert Magner 
Science 
Boston College 

William McCallum 
Guidance 
Boston University 

George Murphy 
English 
Boston College 

Martha Murphy 
Home Economics 
Simmons College 











17 






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John Nionakis 
Foreign Language 
University of Mass. 

Paul Noiseux 
Industrial Arts 
University of Maine 

Gale Nutter 
Home Economics 

Brian O'Donnell 
Social Studies 

Steven Olson 

Math 

Bridgewater State College 



Charles Ozug 

English 

Bridgewater State College 

John Penny 

Science 

Syracuse University 

Tammy Perlman 
Social Studies 
University of Vermont 

Barbara Peters 

English 

Boston University 

Richmond Poole 

Science 

Yale University 





18 





Agnes Quill 

Business 

Boston University 

Barbara Rattray 

Grade Administrator Secretary 

Boston University 

Louise Reilly 
English — Reading 
Boston College 

Carol Robison 
Foreign Language 
Baldwin-Wallace College 

Joseph Roper 
Guidance — Careers 
University of Bridgeport 



Douglas Ryan 
Foreign Language. 
University of Mass. 

Joseph Ryan 
Industrial Arts 
Fitchburg State College 

Dorothy Schillig 
Sec. Office 

Karl Schmatzler 
Industrial Arts 

Charles Shaffer 

Music 

Florida State College 




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Barbara Shapiro 


Donald Sullivan 


Spanish 


Media 


Boston University 


Clark University 


David Sharpe 


Fred Symes 


German 


Business 


Boston College 






Doris Taam 


Diana Sides 


Science 


Business 


Mass. Institute of Technology 


Suffolk University 


, 




Frank Tierney 


Suzanne Smith 


English 


English 


Boston University 


Boston University 






Patricia Tierney 


John Stouffer 


Math 


Scie 


nee 


Boston College 






20 





John Tinker 
Science 
Union College 

Elizabeth Trubia 

Librarian 

Bridgewater State College 

Nancy Waddell 
Social Studies 
Boston University 

Jack Wallace 

Math 

Harvard University 

Roberta Walsh 

Art 

Boston School Museum in Tufts 



Priscilla Wolanyk 
French 

Alice Yacobian 
English 
Boston College 

Joan Grimm RN 

Nurse 

Skidmore College 

John Crowley 

Science 

Syracuse University 

Jane Smith 
Guidance 
Northeastern University 






) 








21 





A splender so sincere and carefree 

An innocent heart diving into darkness 

so many hearts you left behind 

shattered into tiny pieces 

although it may not be easy 

we shall in time mend our hearts of such a wound 

Yet always there will be left the scar of such a loss 

Each heart you did warm so dearly 

with your deep and loving ways 

so generous in your mode and eager to bring any 

happiness 
never shall we leave behind the memories of such a 

boy 
... no one can understand such a loss. 
Thers no explanation as we sit and wonder 
our hearts ache searching for the answer 
"why such an innocent heart" 

Liz Shaw 

You entered our lives, on the crest of a breeze, 
And entered our hearts, forever. 

Laura Coyle 



Mike Manton 
Classmate 



31 







David 
Abreu 



Michael 
Achille 



David 
Adams 



Samuel 
Adams 





Ice: Do it till your satisfied. 

Kim: "For I have known them all already, known them all-. 
Have known the evenings, mornings, afternoons, I have 
measured out my life with coffee spoons;" 

Nancy: Its a nice place to visit but I wouldn't want to stay. 

Mark: You can find anything if you look well enough, even 
happiness. 

Eileen: All's I can say is its a damn shame!! 



Thomas 
Aitken 



Kimberly 
Alger 







Nancy 
Amoroso 



Mark 
Anderson 



Eileen 
Andrews 



Tim 
Andrews 



32 







Mark 
Angeramo 



Jacquelyn 
Antonie 



Alison 
Arena 



Elizabeth 
Argiro 



Jackie: So when I tell you that I love you, it doesn't mean 
you'll never leave, just that I wish you wouldn't. 

Al: We may change with the season, but the seasons will not 
change us. 

Robin: By By. 





Mary Ann 
Argiro 



Howard 
Arkell 







Carrie 
Armstrong 



Robin 
Ashworth 



Howard 
Asnes 



Patricia 
Ayers 



33 







Kristin 
Balerna 



Frank 
Barbuto 



Andrew 
Bargende 



Kristine 
Barnes 





Pris: All you've got to do is call, and I'll be there - You've got 
a friend. 

Andrew: Remember the Good Oak 

Kris: There is much more learning than knowing in the world - 
Thomas Fuller 

Liz: Some people learn to lie - it's the fortunate ones who 
learn to create. 

Judith: The most wasted day of all is that one in which you 
have not laughed. 

Sue B.: May the saddest days of your future be no worse than 
the happiest days of your past. 

Linda: We may be wretched, but we are the champions. 



Elizabeth 
Barone 



Mary Ann 
Barrasso 







Kenneth 
Barrows 



Judith 
Bartlett 



Susan 
Bartlett 



Linda 
Barton 



34 







Lauren 
Battista 



Edward 
Baumgartner 



Annette 
Beatty 



Susan 
Belknap 



Lauren: Happiness is not having the things you want, but 
wanting the things you have. 

Ted: The sea, the new frontier, challenging, exciting, myster- 
ious. 

Jay: Goodbye! 

David: Lose your dreams and you may lose your mind. 

Ovida Elaine: Good future is unto the seeker. 





Cynthia 
Bell 



Douglas 
Bennett 






feEJ. ^1'^ 




Gerald 
Bergggren 



David 
Birkenfield 



Timothy 
Bowen 



Ovida 
Britton 



35 







Wendy 
Brown 



Stephen 
Bryant 



Joseph 
Buckley 



John 
Budde 





Wendy: Be an individualist; one who follows another is always 
one step behind. 

Buck: "Sometimes I feel I'm in the middle of a Woody Allen 
Flick." 

Budwinkle: Our hope lies in the future, and future will real- 
ize our hopes. 

Ma: Sky be my depth, wind be my with and height! Points! 

Sallie: ". . . What a long, strange trip it's been." 



Fred 
Budlong 



Mary 
Burke 







William 
Burke 



Peter 
Buttkus 



Sally 
Buxton 



Gregory 
Caira 



36 







Walter 
Callahan 



Douglas 
Calnan 



Ronald 
Campbell 



Christopher 
Capezuto 



Doug: To be is to make mistakes; To be perfect is to have 
many mistakes. 

Ronnie: "We try harder". 

Maggie: Know thyself. 

Tom: To get something in life you have to want it bad enough 
first. 

Cato: "The cup of life's for him that drinks and not for him 
that sips." 




Ernie 
Capparotta 




\ 



\ 



\ 



Edward 
Carnes 







Helen 
Carr 



Kathy 
Casagrandi 



Thomas 
Casey 



Christopher 
Caton 



37 







Susan 
Caton 



David 
Childs 



Jeff 
Clabault 



Daniel 
Clark 





Danal: If you don't like it the first time-wait till the second. 

Susan: Jumble cribbum . . . points, my friends!!! 

David: It matters not how long we live; but how we live it. 

Cotton Tail: "He with all his marbles, has no friends." 

Dana: Hey tomorrow, where are you going? Do you have 
some room for me? 

John:"YOWIE" 



Sandra 
Clark 



Robert 
Clement 










John 
Cochran 



Thomas 
Coffey 



Dana 

Collier 



h * 



Deirdre 

Collins 



,^ 



38 







Margaret 
Collins 



Ann Marie 
Comer 



Denise 
Connors 



Clare 
Conroy 



Meg: If you can imagine it you can achieve it; if you can 
dream it you can become it. 

Clare: Don't stop believing - you'll get by. 

Denise: Too have a friend is to be one . . . 





Joseph 
Conti 



Laura 
Cook 







Linda 
Cosgray 



Paul 
Costello 



Richard 
Cox 



Dennis 
Coyne 



39 





^1 id 






Phillip 
Craig 



David 
Creighton 



Arthur 
Cronin 



James 
Crowley 





Phil: Why?? 

Art: It's not worth doing unless you do it right. 

Sarah: If you love something set if free; it if comes back it's 
love, if it doesn't it never was. 

Ahforphk: Onward through the fog. 

Steve: Forever it will be for sure. 

Paulette: If you can imagine it, you can achieve it, if you can 
dream it, you can become it. 



Sarah 
Curtis 



Gary 
Cusack 







Patricia 
Daly 



Steven 
Damewood 



Paulette 
D'Angelo 



Bradford 
Darrach 



40 







Susan 
Davis 



Joan 
Dedian 



Sheryl 
Deems 



Dwight 
Delude 



Sue: I wish for you my friend, this happiness I have found. 

Joan: Life is a journey, not a destination, climb high, climb 
far, your aim the sky your goal the star. 

Sheri: Parting is such sweet sorrow. 

Dwight: I'm no leader, I'm no joiner, and I'm no follower and 
if I die alone I'll die alone. 

Tater Picker: "I get by with little help from my Friends." 

Tom: It not what we learn but what we do with what we've 
learned. 

John: Nothing in life is more valuable than good friends. 





Elizabeth 
Devitt 



Donald 
Deware 







Thomas 
Dewitt 



Lisa 
Diersch 



John 
Diezemann 



Maureen 
Dillon 



41 







Michael 
Doherty 



Catherine 
Donahue 



Michael 
Downing 



Edward 
Doyle 





Michael: Life's a bitch. 

Cathy: If I were to seek my own glory, there would be no glory 
at all. 

Ted: Nobody is above talking nonsense, the tradedy is when it 
is done solemnly. 

Malcolm: Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice shame 
on me. 

Terry: Bad sneakers and a Pina Colada my friend . . . 

Greig: When you walk through life, walk tall. 

Mark: Life is but a game and we are but the players. 



Jeannie 
Drummond 



Peter 

Duggan 







Therese 
Dwyer 



Christopher 
Eaton 



Greg 
Elliott 



Mark 
Elliott 



42 







Laurence 
Ellis 



Ritchie 
Ellis 



Jon 
Engdahl 



Alicia 
Ernst 



Lishe: Kiss today goodbye . . . and point me towards to- 
morrow. 

Carol: The world stands out on either side, no wider than the 
heart is wide. 

Dennis: You better hope I never get out. 

Fishman: Your thoughts of today create your joy for to- 
morrow. 






i SB i 

^ ill 






Carol 
Fairfield 



Dennis 
Falvey 







Richard 
Feitelberg 



Jeffrey 
Ferguson 



James 
Finley 



John 
Fisher 



43 







Bruce 

Fithian 



Barry 
Fitzgerald 



Catherine 
Flanagan 



Diane 
Ford 





Bruce: Later Much. 

Fitzy: This place is history. 

Ronny: I pulled out of the waters of education. 

Jane: Hear what I have to say but don't listen to closely. Ask- 
ing for twice as much as I want, I hope only to get what I 
need. 

Lisa: No brain, no pain. 

Gail: We will always think of our future days, but never for- 
get our past ones. 



Ronald 
Frappier 



Jane 
Freeman 







Frederick 
Gallagher 



Lorraine 
Gallo 



Lisa 
Garvin 



Gail 

Gatturna 



44 







Sarah 
Gellatly 



Bonnie 
Glasheen 



Gary 
Goldberg 



Joyce 
Gordon 



Sarah: They can because they think they can! 

Bonnie: Life just is. You have to flow with it, give yourself to 
the moment, let it flow. 

Joyce: Do not follow where the path leads. Rather, go where 
there is no path and leave a trail. 

Leon: Life is like a map, you may take many different routes 
to reach one destination. 

Donna: We're not the first . . . we're not the last . . . but it feels 
like we've been here the longest! 

Gratta: Love can change people but people can't change love. 

Ellen: One laughs, one cries, two uniquely human traits and 
the main thing in life is never be afraid of being human! 

Nita: Be glad of life, it gives us chance to love, dream, act, and 
most of all to reach the sun. 

Julie: One is only as smart as he thinks he is. 




Leon 
Granahan 




Donna 
Grassie 







Maria 
Gratta 



Ellen 
Gray 



Juanita 
Green 



Julie 
Guarina 



45 







James 
Guerra 



Charles 
Gyukeri 



Jeff 
Haack 



Leslie 
Haggblom 





James: If you think you're good, you are I. 

Chuckles: Life is like a cycle - you have to live in it. 

Jeff: Good luck to those who take early auto shop and work till 
1 1 p.m. 

Les: Don't stop thinking about tomorrow; don't stop, it will 
soon be here. 

Sheila: I still love those good days gone by - hold on to them 
close or let them go. 

John: John 3:16 

Pamski: Kiss today good-bye and point me towards tomorrow, 
wish me luck the same to you . . . 



Sheila 
Hall 



Daniel 
Ham 







David 
Ham 



John 
Hamon 



James 
Hanlon 



Pamela 
Harvey 



46 







Robert 
Hatch 



Elizabeth 
Hawes 



Lauren 
Healey 



Paul 
Hennessey 



Hatchberg: Don't trust anyone unless your brother's a laywer. 

Lizzie: "Let us fill our finest cups with the wine and celebrate 
our Love of life." 

Peter: UNACCEPTABLE! 

Hernie: I am I, and I like being what I am, Me. 

Brenda: Youth and innocence are a matter of the heart and 
mind rather than a matter of age. 





Raymond 
Hennessey 



William 
Healey 






?* ' 'j -^ »i , jL \ 





Peter 

Henrickson 



Paula 

Hernberg 



Susan 
Herzberg 



Brenda 
Hickey 



47 







William 
Hickey 



Stephen 
Hickman 



Stephanie 
Higgins 



Barbara 
Hinkley 





Ima: Life can be odd at times; what does it prove? It is a game 
you play to see how fast people can grow up. But in time 
they wish they were young again. 

Squirrel: Ignore em' and maybe they'll go away. 



Pamela 
Hinkley 



Janet 
Hines 







Brian 
Hoar 



Stephen 
Hoelschen 



Karen 
Honkalehto 



Wendy 
Houghton 



48 







George 
Howard 



Sherman 
Hoyt 



Robert 
Hudson 



Judith 
Hulbert 



Sherm: "The Larch" 

Judy: Good things come to those who wait. 

Hutch: History is full of many quotes, but only you can make 
them come to life. 

Kelly: Before you discover your handsome prince . . . you have 
to kiss a lot of toads! 

Marybeth: Hingham: Believe it or not, we all have had pretty 
good times her - I'll miss it - and everyone I love. 





John 
Hutchinson 



Kelly 
Ireton 







Marybeth 
James 



William 
Jefferson 



Mark 
Jenning 



Lorraine 
Johnson 



49 







Robert 
Johnson 



Charles 
Johnston 



Paula 
Kachin 



Lynn 
Kaloyanides 





Bruce 
Kay 



-i M 

Ann 
Kelley 



Lisa: It's a long, long road ... for which there is no return. 
Bruce: To immortalize the soccer goons of 1977. 
Annie: It's just that demon life has got me in it's sway. 
Darlene: What a thing friendship is - World without end! 






IL 



I 




Darlene 
Kennedy 



Gary 
Kessener 



Michelle 
King 



Christopher 
Knight 



50 







Karin 
Koonce 



Anita 
Kost 



Susan 
Krall 



Jacquelyn 
Kurciviewz 



Karin: Can a sane man survive in an insane world? 

Anita: I see my light come shinning, from the west unto the 
east. Any day now, any day now, I shall be released. 

Susan: Contentment is just as important as happiness. 

Jackie: Lifes short, so smile and enjoy it. 

Joaquina: The more man learns the less he knows, and the 
more involved his thinking grows. 

Mini Guinea Shortstuff: "You've gotta go slow below the sur- 
face, and easy through the waves ..." 

Cyndy: The way to be happy is to make others so. 





Jacuelyn 
Lamb 



David 
Lane 






/ 




Lisa 
Langone 



William 
Langrill 



Cynthia 
Lassen 



Christopher 
Leonard 



51 







Paula 
Levin 



David 
Lewiecki 



Marian 
Lincoln 



Stephen 
Linscott 








r^ ^? 


1 




' / 

1 


7 



Robert 
Litz 



Jennifer 
Lubrano 



P.K.: What am I going to do for a living. I want to see what's 
never been seen; I want to live all of my dreams. 

David: Relativity is the essence of all content. 

Steve: The memories of a laughter so free and a love so deep 
perpetuate life. 

Robert: Mein schonstes, jahr, in Amerika. 

Jenny: Love when you can, cry when you have to, be who you 
must, that's a part of the plan. 

Ce.r The future always arrives a little before you are ready to 
give up the present. 

Darcy: A smile takes but a moment; the memory lasts forever. 

Grinch: It was dark and I was drunk. 







David 

Lundquist 



Cecilia 
Lutz 



Gerald 
Lynch 



Darcy 
Lyon 



52 







^p 



Richard 
Lyons 



Timothy 
Lyons 



Jeffrey 
Maccune 



Penelope 
MacEachern 



Rick: Today is unimportant when you contemplate tomorrow. 

Penny: Smile! It makes everybody wonder what you've been 
up to. 

Cheryl: Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken 
winged bird that cannot fly." 

Karen: All things left behind slowly fade away into memories. 

Sue: "We're not here for a long time, we're here for a good 
time!" 





Cheryl 
Makinen 



Catherine 
Mallory 







Kathleen 
Malloy 



Karen 
Mann 



Susan 
Mansfield 



Michael 
Manton 



53 







Jeffrey 
Marcus 



Bradford 
Marsh 



Ernest 
Marx 



Teresa 
McGovern 





Elizabeth 

McGrath 




Patricia 
McKenna 



.> 




Jeff: He who would not when he may when he would shall 
have nay. 

Ernie: Good things come in small packages. 

Flip: But all is changed with time, the future none can see, the 
road you leave behind, ahead lies mystery. 

Susan: Each person is different-never to exist before, and 
never to exist again. 

David: "Why?", "Why not?" 

Mike: I wish I was filthy rich. A reprieve. 







Susan 
McLaughlin 



David 
McNeice 



Kenneth 
Milan 



Michael 
Moffa 



54 







Mary 
Monaco 



Thomas 
Monaco 



Robert 
Monaco 



Mark 
Morrison 



Mo: Whipped 

Van: "The days of our youth are the days of our glory" 

Bob: If you don't know what you want to do, it's harder to do 
it. 

Mully: A thinker goes nowhere, a dreamer goes everywhere. 

Ann: No one needs a smile so much as the person who has 
none to give. 

Murph: I'll see you sailing. 





Lynnette 
Mortland 



Van 
Mount 




/ 






Warren 
Mudge 



John 
Mullin 



Ann 
Murphy 



Bret 

Murphy 



55 







John 
Murphy 



Mary Ellen 
Murphy 



Thomas 
Nardo 



Robert 
Nevins 




Paul 

Niland 




Susanne 
Noon 



John: Within each apple there is the potential for a million or- 
chards 

Mary Ellen: It's the set of the soul that decides its goal, and not 
the calm or the strife. 

Ray: Giv'me some money! 

Vito: There is not time like the present, so I'll wait until to- 
morrow 

Bob: What a rave! 

Starsky: Live life to the fullest laugh — Smile — Be happy; 
Make every second a special occasion. You only live once. 

Sue: A man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the 
courage to lose sight of the shore. 

Tom: II y a trois langues universelles: I'amour, lex beaux arts, 
et les mathematiques. 

Mary: If you can imagine it, you can achieve it. If you can 
dream it, you can become it. 







Lisa 

Norris 



Thomas 
Norton 



Robert 
O'Keefe 



Mary 
O'Neal 



56 







Thomas 
O'Regan 



Leslie 
Osborne 



Brian 
Packard 



Nancy 
Parker 



Tommy: 25,000 years is as far as the eye can see on the clear- 
est of Nights. 

Brian: You can't always get what you want, but you can try. 

Patches: A man needs a little intelligent ignorance to get any- 
where in life, but never give a sucker an even break . . . 
right F.T.? 

Dana: The important thing is not so much in discovering one's 
roots as in branching out for one's self. 





Thomas 
Patch 



Dana 
Paul 







Timothy 
Peaslee 



Nora 
Pelrin 



John 
Peraino 



Minna 
Perraa 






H 


fri 


^1 




^ i 




I 


c ^ 


Jv 





Mark 
Peterson 



Janet 
Piazza 



Bruce 
Pinel 



Carol 
Pizzelli 





Peteskin: I know that you believe that you understand what 
you think I said, but I am not sure that you realize that what 
you heard is not what I meant. 

Donna: Wear a smile - always. 

Ned: I worry about being a success in a mediocre world. 

Patty: Live today like it's your last. 

Jenny: Smile and the world smiles with you, frown and you 
frown alone. 

Lauren: Yesterday is but today's memory, and tomorrow is to- 
day's dream. 



Lauren 
Power 



Donna 
Powers 






Edward 
Price 



Patricia 
Principato 



Jennifer 
Puleo 



Jose 
Puoli 



58 




i- 






Nancy 
Raymond 



John 
Read 



Carol 
Regan 



Abigail 
Rhines 



Carol - A person who cannot be a fool, at times is a fool. 
Abby - He is King of Kings and Lord of Lords. I Tim. 6.15. 
Tod - It's nice to be important but more important to be nice. 
Chris - The years teach much what the days never know. 
Beth - Love when you can-cry when you have to. 





William 
Ribaudo 



Theodore 
Ricci 







Marian 
Richards 



Beth 
Richardson 



Michael 
Richardson 



Thomas 
Rogers 



59 







Paula 
Romano 



Lourdes 
Roth 



William 
Rubbo 



Patricia 
Ruddy 





Lourdes: We can't return, we can only look behind from 
where we came. 

Rud: "What lies behind you and what lies be for you, are tiny 
matters compared to what lies within you." 

Beth: Cherish yesterday . . . live today . . . dream of tomorrow. 

Sean: If you can't bafel'em with brillance, bafel'em with bull- 
shit. 

Shimmer: We've only just begun to live. 

Stu: We only have one life to live, and this is no dress rehear- 
sal. 



Elizabeth 
Ryan 



Sean 
Ryan 




1 K 






Larry 
Schelle 



Stuart 

Schiffman 



Michael 
Schiller 



Jeanne 
Schmid 



60 







Kathryn 
Schmid 



Peter 
Scholtes 



Marie 
Scioscia 



Peter 
Secatore 



Riesey: You can be true to others but you must be true to 
yourself. 

Peter: If all you talk about is yesterday, then you haven't done 
anything worth while today. 

Carol: We must learn to love people and use many things, not 
use people and love things. 

Heidi: Well-timed silence has more eloquence than speech. 

Liz: Time goes on? Ah-no! Alas, Time stays - We go. 

Jan: Through love one creates his own personality and helps 
others create theirs. 

Karin: Variety is the Spice of life. 





Walter 
Secatore 



Carol 
Sestito 







Heidi 
Shahbaz 



Elizabeth 
Shaw 



Janet 
Shaw 



Karin 
Shea 



61 




H^^H^^^^^^^^^H 


■ 






xSl 


r 




r 

1 





Elizabeth 
Sheridan 



Andrea 
SchoUer 



Craig 
Simpson 



Christine 
Singleton 




Brian 
Southwick 




Deborah 
Stamper 



Elizabeth: The Earth has music for those who listen. 

Andi: I have never let my schooling interfere with my educa- 
tion. 

Simpa: There's no Muff too tough - You must learn to make 
love, 

Chris: Green grass and high tides forever. 

Brian: No quote is a good quote. 

Debbie: A ship in a harbor is safe but that's not what ships 
were built for. 

Connie: Act now. Ask questions later. D.P. 

Valerie: Friends are like warm clothes in the night air. Best 
when they're old and missed most when they're gone. 

Chuck: The things you see when you don't have a gun. 

Johnese: For you will still be here tomorrow but your dreams 
may not. 





4 

i 





Connie 
Stevens 



Valerie 
Stimpson 



John 
Stoddard 



Johnese 
Sullivan 



62 







Kathryn 
Sullivan 



Pamela 
Sullivan 



William 
Sullivan 



Marie 
Suscillon 



Katy: I'm free as a bird now. 



Pam: Time changes so many things, but; our friendship has 
stood up against all knowing that I have friends like you. 

Sully: More people are flattered into virtue than bullied into 
vice ... I think? 

Marie: And by the power of a word, I start my life again; I was 
born to know you, to name you: Liberty. 

Nancy: We are here to party. 



Pepe: You only get out of life what you put into it. 

Teebs: Character is a diamond that scratches every other 
stone. 

Larry: May you live as long as you want to; may you want to 
as long as you live. 




Nancy 
Swofford 




Karen 
Taylor 







Scott 
Taylor 



Mark 
Thibault 



Lawrence 
Thomas 



Melinda 
Thomas 



63 







Valerie 
Thomas 



Gregory 
Thornton 



Donna 
Tocchio 



Barbara 
Toland 





Val: A friendly smile goes a long way. 

Donna: Cherish yesterday; dream tomorrow; live today. 

Kathy: To be a friend is never forgotten. 

Bob: Hey Ice Cream. 



Kathryn 
Tornberg 



Robert 
Tose 






\ 




Steven 
Tower 



Gail 
Troia 



Patricia 
Tully 



Robert 
Vardarc 



64 







Michael 
Vaughan 



Kathy 
Vaughn 



Kathleen 
Vickery 



Kevin 
Vigneau 



Kathy: "... parting is not painful, for that which you 
love most in a friend may be clearer in his absence, as the 
mountain to the climber is clearer from the plain." 

Sherry: Await your arrival with simple survival, and one day 
we 11 all understand. 

Wardy: Duke's Up! 

Leslie: Learn as though you will live forever; live as if you will 
die tomorrow. 





Mark 

Vlachos 



Sheryl 
Wade 







John 
Wall 



Robert 

Ward 



Leslie 
Warden 



Carla 
Waters 



65 







Harold 
Waugh 



Rhonda 
Way 



Kathleen 
Welch 



John 

Wells 





Martha 
West 



William 
Wheaton 



Kathy: It's never to late. 

John: The future is awaited with great anticipation and hope. 

Bill: Non illigitime carbarundum est. 

Nancy: It's lazy people who get things done. 

Melissa: It's the laughter we will remember whenever we re- 
member the way we were. 

Sneaks: In God we trust. Everyone else pays cash. 

Disco Kid: Dance your ass off! 

Clyde: "... You might as well." 

Lauren: On to bigger and better things - diamonds are forever. 

Rhonda: It matters not who you love! It matters not how you 
love! It matters most that you love! 







Nancy 
Whelan 



Melissa 
Whish 



Donald 

White 



Robert 

Whiting 



66 







Terence 
Wigmore 



Dana 
Williams 



Jodi 

Wolfe 



Lauren 
Wood 




t> 



\ 



WW 




Joan 
Dunn 



Terry 
Olson 




Randall 
Wood 




Daniel 

Wright 



,1/ 







Paula 
Yetman 



Christopher 
Curry 



Malcolm 
Dunley 



Scott 
Jenkins 



67 



Food: Everything 



Pizza 
Italian 
Chinese 
Lasagna 



wiiiiAn 





^■0 



f P 





68 



I 





Top Five Favorites Of The Class Of 78 




Music: Rock 

Soft Rock 
Disco 
Jazz 
Folk 



Subject: 



English 

Math 

History 

Biology 

Science 



69 










70 




Top Five Favorites Of Class 78 

Movie: Rocky 

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's 

Nest 
Star Wars 
Young Frankenstein 
Monty Python and Holy Grail 

Sport: Football 
Hockey 
Skiing 
Baseball 
Basketball 






71 






/ 



^ 





Top Five Favorites Of Class Of 78 



T.V. Show: Soap 

Mash 

Saturday Night Live 
Three's Company 
Monty Python 



Musical Group: 



Fleetwood Mac 
Grateful Dead 
Chicago 
Steely Dan 
Crosby, Stills, 
Nash and Young 




V 



71 



r 



Top Five 
Favorites Of 
Class Of 78 



Car! Mercedes 
Porsche 
Mustang 
Corvette 
Camaro 












i^^A 





73 






^45 " ■ 







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74 



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75 




t ^ A ^ 







,r-% y^n ,y 



FOOTBALL 

ROW 1 - P. HENNESSEY, T. BAUMGARTNER, D. WHITE, J. CROWLEY, D. CALNAN, M. THIBAULT, (TRI-CAPTS) 
C. SIMPSON, J. HANLON, R. COX, B. WARD, S. DAMEWOOD, B. MUDGE, T. MONACO, B. WAUGH, T. CASEY, M. 
MORRISSON. ROW 2 - T. EGAN, R. GIARUSSO, R. YOUNG, K. MCCHORD, M. STEVENSON, P. INGRAHAM, J. GRIF- 
FIN, M. O'BRIAN, R. PIRANIAN, D. MCHUGH, G. MICHLESON, C. KELLY ROW 3 - S. MCDONOUGH (MANAGER), 
K. LASORDO, P. APPESSOS, T. KRALL, M. MCCARRON, E. CASEY, T. CARRIGAN, E. FITZWILLIAM, M. LINCOLN, 
B. WEISER, A. SHAW, L. CAVANAUGH, B. COX, S. PROUTY, C. CASEY, D. SMITH 



76 





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SI 



Soccer Cheerleaders: C. Costello, K. Davis, L. Healey, P. Linscott, B. Thibault, J. Shaw, R. Mello, S. Drumenhauser Co-Captains: 
Flip McGrath, Sheila Hall 




Football Cheerleaders: H. Demco, J. Barret, J. Antoine, M. Monaco, B. Gushue, K. Ireton (Captain) C. Reagan (Captain) P. 
D'Angelo, S. Curtis M. Donovan, T. Scary 



79 





:.«*^"*!»r«a 



GIRLS FIELD HOCKEY - VARSITY 

ROW 1 - (TRI-CAPTAINS) P. AYERS, N.WHE- 

LAN, N. RAYMOND, D. KIMBALL, L. SMITH, 

B. HICKEY ROW 2 - S. BURBANK, M. LANG, 

C. O'CONNELL, K. ECKART, P. KEENAN, J. 
LUBRANO M. WHISH, N. SWOFFORD, L. 
BARTON, COACH MERIDETH GORDON 







GIRLS FIELD HOCKEY - JUNIOR VARSITY 

ROW 1 - N. WARDEN, P. SULLIVAN, M. PYNE, S. MAR- 

GLIN, C. LINDBERG, L. MOREFELL ROW 2 - J. THRE- 

FALL, M. LEARY, K. LENEHAN, C. LEWIS, M. MES- 

SNER, M. HARLING J. HAMON COACH - BARBARA 

HOUGH 




7 •. .^ 









^. 







BOYS SOCCER 

ROW 1 - B. NEVINS, K. GONSALVES, S. LINSCOTT, L. 
POULI, S. DANE, A. MOUNT, R. PEASE, J. WALL, B. 
KAY, K. LEARY, E. MARX, COACH - ED CONNORS ROW 
2 - COACH - CRAIG LOW, D. CREIGHTON, D. FARRELL, 
S. WITTKOWSKI, C. COLLETL C. DEANE, J. FISHER, 
S. BRYANT, B. BURKE. T. DOYLE, M. RICHARDSON, 
D. LANE, P. MC CARTHY, V. MOUNT, S. ADAMS, S. 
HOYT, A. CRONIN 




83 




84 





4/= ^ ^^ < /. 






^.44--' ^ ^ 



ia>L ii ' afliirfm I ', 



85 







86 




WRESTLING 

T. SNOBER, S. FULTON, T. ALGER, L. HAMILTON, T. BAUMGARTNER, P. CROWLEY, T. WIGMORE, M. ELLIOTT, 

B. SOUTHWICK, A. ROBINSON CAPTAINS: T. BAUMGARTNER, T. WIGMORE 





87 




BOYS TRACK 

BACK ROW - MR. RYAN - COACH, B. SULLIVAN, F. ANDERSON, C. LEONARD (CAPT), R 
MANELY, M. HUGHES, C. HOYT, M. MOFFETT FRONT ROW - T. RICCI, B. MC MEEKIN, D. 
COYNE, P. BALBONI, G. LINSCOTT, M. STEVES 





88 











GIRLS TRACK-ROW 1 - MR. RYAN - COAHC, D. HENDRICK- 
SON, L. NOBLE, J. MC NEICE, J. DRUMMONDS, M. WAM- 
POLE, D. JORDON, K. CODY 



89 






THESPIANS 

Mr. Berlenbach, R. Lyons, K.Alger, S.Gregg, J.Heapes, N.Green, C.Richards, L.Kaloyanides, P.Harvey, G.Elliot, S.Shiffman 



90 




DRAMA CLUB 

B.Berlenbach, Director, Officers: Chris Richards, Lyn Kaloyanides, Pam Harvey, and Jeanne Heapes 2nd R. K,Kaloyanides 
T.Eaton, P.Hiscock, L.Carr, J.Urbati, J.Chipman, C. Booth, M.Marchesiani, L. Chen, L.Coyle, B.Darrach, B. Whiting, M. 
Scotia, G.Elliott, C.Jennings 3rd R. K.Cooke, S.Sommers, L.Galvin, J.Koelinger, M. Arena, A.Brown, B.Ertman, M.Barnes, 
O.Britton, D.Driscoll, M.Doherty, K. Martin 4th R. S.Gregg, V.Stimpson, R. Gasparello, R.Lyons, S.Adams, K. Alger, A. 
Arena, B. Bravo, A.Beatty, B.Megquier, J.Misler, N.Greene, T.Hardy 





91 



No No 
Nannette 




92 







93 



Math Club 



Advisor Mr. Baisden 



Math Club 1 to r John Chen, 
Tom Norton, John Hamon, 
Mark Kiley, Sue Belknap, 
Pam Hiscock, Advisor: Mr. 
Baisden 




Computer Club 



Advisor Mr. Deeter 




Computer Club Front: 
John Chen, Jeff Mayo 
2nd row: Bob Mont- 
gomery, Donna Lee 
3rd row: Mark Kiley, 
Mike Downing, Jane 
Blackwood 4th row: 
Scott Jenkins, Tony 
Morgan, Mike Cory, 
Cliff Hoyt 



94 



Hamburg 

Exchange 

Advisor: Mr. Sharpe 

Hamburg Exchange front Diane Smith, Paula Yetman back 
Andrew Bargundy, Jane Freeman, Donna Lee, Dawn Worsley 





Photography Club 



Advisor: Mr. Sullivan 



Photography Club Eric Phillips, David Rizzotto, Derek Richner 
Missing: Richard Lyons, Ned Price, Gary Goldberg, Barry Jameson 



Classics Club 



Advisor: Mr. Ryan 




Classics Club Diane Smith, Peter Franklin, David Crowley, 
Barbara Lamb, Debbie Stockwell 



95 



Social 

Action 

Club 



Advisor: 
Mrs. Howard 




SOCIAL ACTION CLUB 

FRONT ROW RICHARD LYONS, JOHN WELLS, VALERIE 
STIMPSON, CHRIS RICHARDS, MARTHA SHAW, DOUG CAL- 
NAN, TOM PATCH, LESLIE WARDEN, LIN SHORE, LAUREN 
BATTISTA, ALICIA ERNST, KAREN SHEA. BACK ROW CHRIS 
BARNES, MAGGIE CARR, JAN SHAW, KATHY VICKERY, 
MARIA SCOCIO, NANCY PARKER, MARY MARXIANO, MARK 
THIBAULT, SUE DRUMMOND, LIN BARRETTI, CHRIS 
SWEENEY, ELLEN GREY, ANDREA SHOLLER, DEE DEE 
COLLINS. 




Advisor: Mr. Kirkaldy 
& Mr. Obrien 



International 

INTERNATIONAL 
AFFAIRS 

LEFT TO RIGHT JAY 
SNOVER, DAVID CHILDS, 
JOHN DIEZEMANN, TED 
DOYLE, MR. OBRIEN, 
BOB NEVINS, MR. KIRK- 
CALDY, KARIN SHEA, 
DEE DEE COLLINS, VAN 
MOUNT, JOE BUCKLEY, 
TOM PATCH, TERRI 
DWYER, CHRIS O NEIL 

Affairs Club 



Convention II 



Advisor: Mr. Lacatell 



HINGHAM DELEGATION 
TO CONVENTION II IN 
WASHINGTON 
LEFT TO RIGHT ALLISON 
ARENA, MARIA SUSCIL- 
LION, MEG COLLINS, 
TOM CASEY, TOM 
PATCH, DANA COLLIER, 
DOUG CALNAN, LIZ 
SHAW, LESLIE WARDEN, 
LAUREN POWER, FLIP 
MCGRATH, ALICIA 

ERNST, JOHNESE SUL- 
LIVAN, ANDREA SHOL- 
LER, ADVISOR - DAVID 
LACATELL MISSING - 
BOB WHITING 




96 




The Yearbook Staff 



Advisor: Mr. Frank Tierney 



Editors-in-Chief: 
Cecilia Lutz, Tom Casey 

Doug Calnan, Ellen Grey, Ted Doyle, Tom Aiken, Mark Ander- 
son, Brenda Hickey, Andrea Sholler, Alicia Ernst, Ernie Marx, 
Jan Shaw, Chris Caton, Liz Shaw, Richard Lyons, Johnese Sull- 
ivan, Dana Paul, Leslie Warden, Mark Thibault, John Dieze- 
mann, Tom Norton, Tod Ricci 



The Yearbook Staff acknowledges with deep appreciation the 
tremendous support, encouragment, and patience given us by 
our advisor, Mr. Frank Tierney. 




97 




NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

front row: Bill Waugh, David Lane, Carrie Reagen, Dennis Coyne, Alison Arena, Jane Freeman, Sue Belknap, Jackie Kurcheviz, Ernie 
Marx, Mark Thibault, Ellen Grey, Terry Dwyer, Liz Shaw. Middle row: Andrea Sholler, Sue McLaughlin, Alicia Ernst, Jackie Lamb, Kris 
Barnes, Kristin Belirna, Pattie Ayers, Mary Ellen Murphy, Lyn Kaloyanides, Chris Richards, Cecilia Lutz (Secretary), John Hutchinson, 
Bob Johnson, Abbey Rhines. Back row: Leslie Warden, Bill Wheaten, Tom Casey, Van Mount, Meg Collins Darlene Kennedy, John 
Hamon (President), Darcy Lyon, Nancy Swafford, Wendy Brown, Chris Caton (Vice President), Tom Norton, Rob Tose, Richard Lyons, 
Stuart Shiffman. 



A. F. S. CLUB 

Marie Suscillion (France), Jean- 
nie Laufgrin, Robert Litz (Ger- 
many), Chris Russel, Ellen Grey, 
Wendy Brown, Jenny Stanley, 
Darcy Lyon, Jennie Labrano 
(President), Liz Devitt, Chris 
O'Neal. 




98 




Project Traces 

Front Row: John Oblanes, Paul Shafer, Owen Flarherty, Joe O'Keefe, Dan Murphy, Mitchell Wojtasinksi Back Row: 

Tim Bowen, Scott Airth, Jeff Thompson, Scott Bakus Andy Reed, Mike Davin, Dave Ricci 




Ski Club 

Doug Calnan, Chris Caton 
Tom Crall, Eric Casey, Bern- 
adette Gushue, Linda Nyman, 
Jenny Stanley, Andrea Shol- 
ler. Sue McLaughlin, Martha 
Driscoll, Leslie Warden, 
Sheila Hall, Bill Richards, 
Beth Coates, Richard Lyons, 
Rosemary Condari, Laurie 
Deems Phyllis Chafe, Bob 
Mudge, John Wall, Jane Bar- 
ret, Carol Driscoll, Gail Tay- 
lor Bob Bravo, Advisor: Mr. 
Clark 



99 



Class 
Officers 



CLASS OFFICERS 

SENIOR CLASS 
MARK THIBAULT 
DOUG CALNAN 
STEPHANIE HIGGINS 
TERRY DWYER 

JUNIOR CLASS 
JENNY STANLEY 
RICK DWYER 
JANENE SMITH 
BERNADETTE GUSHUE 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 
SEAN MC DONOUGH 
SUSAN PINEL 
KATIE KELLEY 
CHRIS FALVEY 




Seniors 





Juniors 



Sophomores 



100 




Senior Hall 
Spirit Week 



See-Sawathon 




101 




Student Council Officers 

President: Sheila Hall 
Vice President: Paula Romano 
Secretary: Andrea Sholler 
Treasurer: Nancy Swafford 



Committee Chairman 

Vandalism: Scott Taylor 
Spirit: Liz Shaw 
Fund Raising: Nancy Swafford 
Student Concerns: Sue Noon 
Elections: Paula Romano 




Student Advisory Council 

delegate: Johnese Sullivan 
alternate: Mary Ellen Murphy 

Secretary to the Southeastern Massachusetts Association of Student Coun- 
cils: Johnese Sullivan 



102 



r'l 




PEP CLUB L to R 3rd row: Maureen Eagen, Jenny Stanley, Brett Thibault, Jan Shaw, Casey Redmond, Susan Pinel, Natalie Shelley, 
Darlene Kennedy, Pattie Rudy, Terry Dwyer, Dee Dee Collins Marcia Marshall, Natalie Hayes 2nd row: Cathy Price, Pam Linscott, 
Janene Smith, Claire Delmare, Jean Lofgren, Abbey Rine, Allison Arena, Andrea Shollar, Pam Schnell, Ellen Grey, Debbie Kimball, 
Sheila Hall, Kim Pinkus, 1st row: Amy Sutton, Tracey Reed, Lin Baretti, Flip McGrath, Wendy Brown, Lauren Powers, Leslie Warden, 
Liz Shaw, Lauren Battista, Susan McLaughlin, Susan Davis, Alicia Ernst 

COLOR GUARD L 
to R Carol Jenning, 
Stacey McDonough, 
Judy Chipman, 
Jody Urbati, Chris 
Richards, Shauna 
Young, Valerie 
Stimpson, Jean 
Heapes, Pam Har- 
vey, Sandy Clark, 
Juanita Green 




103 





SPECIAL CHORUS 4TH ROW - SUSAN SMART, MARK 
ANDERSON 3RD ROW - SUSAN SOMMERS, DAVID 
LANE, CHRIS CATON, STU FARNHAM KEVIN 
VIGNEAU 2ND ROW - PAM SCHNELL, KATHY 
KALOYNIDES, TRACEY REED, JEAN LOFGREN, 
STAGEY MACDONALD, DIANE EMERSON. 1ST ROW - 
LYN KALOYNIDES, JANE FREEMAN, JEANNE SMITH, 
DIANE POWERS, JEANNE HEAPES, JEANNIE DRUM- 
MOND, NORA PELRIN, JULIE PETERSON 



Barbershop 
Quartet 



Directed by: 
Mr. Bartolotti 




104 




JAZZ BAND SIDE AND BACK KEN TAGAN, BILL ERMSON, DIANE JORDON, JOHN WELLS, BOB 
JOHNSON, STAGEY GRONIN, DON DRISGOLL 2ND ROW ALAN FEITLBERG, BILL WHEATON, 
DAWN WORSLEY, FRANK MARONA, RONNIE ROSSO, TOM NORTON, ANNETTE BEATTY, 
RALPH GASPERELLO, JEFF WHEATON 

i ^Bi i li Director Mr. 
Schaffer 

-i- 





105 




Christmas Concert 




106 



Singing 



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T'was The 
Night 
Before 

Christmas 



J'J 





107 







108 



I 







^ V 





BOYS VARSITY BASKETBALL 

Back row left to right: Marcellus Furey; Carl McKenzie, Bill Burke, Bob Leonard, Andrew Emman- 
uel, Mark O'Brian, Tucker O'Connell, Peter Shea, Larry Rose. Front row left to right: Coach Morti- 
mer, Mike Sullivan, David Abreau, Scott Taylor, Jerry Lynch, John Griffin. Assistant coach Edmond. 




w m 





no 



mk 




Si-.Mti*tf^ 





Boys J.V. Basketball 

Front Row: Kieth Kruithoff, Marcellus 
Furey, Kevin Leary, David McClanahan, 
Paul Barber, Matt Murphy Back Row: Al 
Sabbag, Gary Michelson, Mike Redmond, 
Coach Edmond, David Martin, Mike 
Hughes, Steve Riley, Missing: David 
Palmer 




111 




Girls Varsity Basketball 

front row 1 to r: Meg Pignataro, Karen Shaw, Kathy Vickery, Patty Ayers, Paula Sullivan, Judy Hulbert. 
back row 1 to r: Johnese Sullivan, Melissa Lang, Donna Deluze, Nancy Roundtree, Mary Deluze, Coach 
Meredith Gordon. 




,m-^. 



K 





112 






Girls J V Basketball 
front row 1 to r: Jane 
Hamon; Maureen 
Walsh, Susie LaHive, 
Ellie LaHive Marie 
Martin, Carol Lewis, 
back row 1 to r: Linda 
Estabrook, Kathy 
Wareham, Kathy Lena- 
han, Lynn Mohrfeld, 
Ann Schwob, Karen 
Bullock, Stephanie 
Marglin. Missing: Lisa 
Goudas. 




113 




Varsity Hockey 

Back Row: Brian Cox, Ron Pease, Richard Neville, Jack Walsh Peter Honkaleto, David Cunminski, Tim Carrigan, Rich Piranian, Roy Gia- 
russo. Chuck Neville, Richard Hannly, George Balerna, Coach Daley Front Row: Ed Rose, Steve Barrett, Paul McCarthy, Gregg Burgess 
Capt. Jeff MacCune, Capt. Rick Cox, Scott Deware, John Wall, Tony Messina, Mike Doyle 







115 




Girls Gymnastics 
1 to r: Maureen Egan, 
Laura Noble, Jenny Stan- 
ley, Brenda Hickey, Coach 
Marty Butler, Beth Coates, 
Elaine Ernst, Gail Taylor, 
Dawn Worsley. 



2'- A 






4 


W^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^k^^^^^ 





116 




Varsity Basketball 

Cheerleaders J. Smith, 
J. Antoine, N. Hayes, 
B. Gushue, J. Kxur- 
cievz, B. Lamb, M. 
Donavan, R. Mello 



Hockey Cheer- 






leaders Marie 




Packard, Phyllis 


J0fl^m 


Chafe, Minna 


^mH 


Perna, Connie 


1 . '. M 


Stevens, Gail 


[^*# 


Taylor, Flip Mc- 


^Mki 


Grath, Sheila 


^^H| 


Hall, Sarah 


^^^1 


Smith, Jodi Ur- 


^^H 


batti, Nancy 


^^H 


Hayes, Janet 


1^^^ 


Watts, Joanne 


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Branson 


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117 







118 




TRACK BACK ROW: D. EMERSON, S. FARNHAM, F. ANDERSON, P. BALBONI, J. SNOVER, M. FOLBERG, A. 
SHAW, M. LINCOLN, G. LINSCOTT, COACH JOE RYAN KNEELING: D. COYNE, R. MANLEY, K. BULLOCK, C. 
SIMPSON, M. THIBAULT, K. CARTMILL SITTING: J. DRUMMOND, C. LEONARD, B. SULLIVAN, J. BUCKLEY, L. 
MURPHY, J. MCNIECE MISSING: C. CATON, M. MORRISON, T. RICCI 





119 




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BASEBALL 

ROW 2 — B. GENOVESE, K. WALKER, S. WELCH, J. GRANITINO, S. MCCHORD, B. STANLEY, M. 

FITZMAURICE, M. LINSCOTT, J. LONG, S. MURPHY 

ROW 1 — J. DELMONICO (MANAGER) R. COX, (CO-CAPT), D. MCHUGH, A. CRONIN, D. CHILDS, D. 

CREIGHTON, (CO-CAPT.), B. LENAHAN, J. KENT, B. WARD, J. MACCUNE, T. CASEY, COACH — JOHN 

KENNEDY 





139 




SOFTBALL 

ROW 2 — G. MORSE, B. THOMPSON, K. MEADER, D. KIMBALL, N. RAYMOND, P. MCKENNA 
(CO-CAPT.) 

ROW 1 — A. PARE, B. DOONAN, D. POWERS, S. SMART, D. STOCKWELL, L. RUDENAUR, S. MANS- 
FIELD (CO-CAPT.), L. BARTON, MISSING — P. AYERS 





140 








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C]»AULT, J. GOOD- 
RICH). LEWEICKI (CO- 
C^m.), J. KNAPP, B. 
NSON, MISSING: J. 
FISHER (CO-CAPT.) 



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BOYS LACROSSE 

ROW 1 — T. CARRIGAN, T. RICHARDSON, J. WALL, B. NEVINS, M. THIBAULT, T. PATCH E. FITZWILLIAM, 

N. IDE 

ROW 2 — R. YOUNG, T. MCSWEENEY, K. LASORDO, K. MC CHORD, M. STEVENSON, P. INGRAHAM, B. 

HOOPER, P. APESSOS, M. SULLIVAN, C. KELLY, H. PETER BAILEY (COACH) 





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144 




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145 




BOYS SPRING TRACK 

ROW 3 — R. MANLY, C. CUNDARI, G. LINSCOTT, D. COYNE, S. DANE, M. LINCOLN 

ROW 1 — M. MAFFA, T. RICCI, C. LENOARD, (CO-CAPT), S. BLACKMUR, B. WAUGH, C. DEAN, 

B. SULLIVAN, (CO-CAPT.), COACH — JOE RYAN 

ROW 2 — J. BUCKLEY, S. BRYANT, M. O'BRIEN, C. SIMPSON, P. BALBONI, P. CROWELY 

Missing — M. ELLIOT, K. BULLOCK, C. CATON, B. MCMEEKIN 













147 




GIRLS SPRING TRACK 

ROW 1 — M. DONAVON, P. SULLIVAN, M. LINCOLN (CO-CAPT), J. WATTS, D. JORDON 

ROW 2 — P. ROMANO, J. REIDY, K. PINKUS, N. WOOD, M. HAYES 

ROW 3 — COACH — GLENN THOMPSON, M. WISH, J. MCNEESE, B. GUSHUE, N. HAYES, M. LANG, 

L. MURPHY, N. SWOFFORD (CO-CAPT) 







148 




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149 




GIRLS TENNIS 

D. KENNEDY, A. MURPHY, J. SULLIVAN, C. LASSEN, COACH-DAVE LACATELL 






150 




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151 





Junior 

Prom 

1977 





152 







153 



Once upon a time, in a land not 
too distant from our own, a 
young lad frolicked innocently 
through the woods. As he wan- 
dered along the familiar paths, 
lost in childish daydreams, he in- 
advertently trod into a dark part 
of the forest where he had never 
been. Upon realizing his surround 
ings, the boy's pace slowed to a 
stop. He was aghast by the enor- 
mous trees, the likes of which he 
had never seen. The roots looked 
like enormous gray serpents. As 
if in a nightmare, he spun, be- 
coming confused, disoriented and 
terrified, He backed away slowly, 
afraid to turn his back on the e- 
normous monsters. The boy froze 
in his tracks as he felt the icy 
burn of cold iron against his 
back. Paralyzed with fear, he 
summoned all his courage and 
whirled to face an imposing iron 
gate. Its immense spires shot 
through the ceiling of clouds 
above, while an impregnable 
stone wall ran as far as the eye 
could see. The scene reminded 
him of a dream he once had. 



And, as if by the power of The 
Force he moved closer and push- 
ed the gate open. With a deafen- 
ing crash the gates slammed be- 
hind him. Suddenly, a looming 
voice sounded like a fog horn, 
"Your're late!" The boy stam- 
mered something inaudible while 
his gaze crept to the peak of a 
rocky crag where a menacing fi- 
gure stood clad in a loosely fitting 
robe. Once again the voice rang 
out, "Why are you late? Are 
your papers in order?" The boy 
tried to speak but was cut short. 
"Just as I thought." the figure 
cried, and pointing toward a path 
which went deeper into the forest, 
he again demanded, "Go forth 
and do not stray from the path 
until you reach a clearing where- 
upon you will be delt with." The 
boy slowly made his way to the 
beginning of the path. He stop- 
ped and asked if this were the 
place the Golden Fleece could be 
found. The figure did not answer 
his question, but instead said, 
"Do not ponder escape. You have 
brought this upon yourself. Now 



go!" 

The path was short and when 
he reached the end, he saw a line 
of young people about his age 
waiting at the opening. Not 
knowing what else to do he ex- 
plained his confusion to the last 
boy in line. The boy, being of a 
friendly nature, explained as 
much as he knew of the situation. 
It seemed that they had done 
something terribly wrong and 
that a powerful warrior. Sir 
O'Night, was there to punish 
them. The boy, who was in front 
of both boys, explained that as 
the legend goes, the people con- 
victed of a crime are sent to the 
Gallows or are eaten alive by the 
Ferocious Pigeon which is as 
large as a man. Somewhat baf- 
fled, the boy before him spoke at 
length until they were interrupted 
by a raspy voice which called 
them forth. They passed through 
the fence and found themselves in 
an arena which was filled with 
spectators. 



ss<-- 




The 

Search 

For 

The 

Golden 

Fleece 

By 

R. U. Joking 



They were blinded momentari- 
ly by the rising dust from Sir 
O'Night's horse. Before they 
knew what was happening, their 
hands were bound behind their 
backs. They were paired in the 
center of the arena where they 
faced Sir O'Night, a large man in 
a black suit of armor sitting on 
top of a brown stallion. He dan- 
gerously wielded a six foot lance 
to the ground, thus sending him 
vaulting to the ground with a 
loud clatter. Immediately, the 
masses rushed to his aid, where- 
upon the boys took advantage of 
the confusion and spirited 
through the fence into the woods. 

The boy ran through the trees 
until he could no longer hear the 
noise of the crowd. It was then 
that he realized that he had lost 
his friend. Exhaused from the 
days running and frightened by 
the days events, the tired boy 



crawled into the nearby bushes 
and fell asleep. 

When the morning's light 
struck the boy's eyes, he awaken- 
ed and was surprised to discover 
that he was being watched by 
four beings. He cowered back, 
but they reassured him they were 
the friendly elves of Mother 
Tums. The tallest spoke, "Do not 
be afraid. We mean you no harm. 
I am Loafer and these are Kool, 
Link and Tinkerbell." Seeing 
that he was still bound, Kool cut 
the rope around his wrist. 

They led him to a cozy room 
filled with fur covered furniture, 
a small wooden table, and a fire- 
place with a bubbling pot. Hud- 
dled over the pot was a dark hair- 
ed woman with a round face. She 
introduced herself warmly, and 
offered him a seat by the fire. He 
watched as she brewed a strange 
mixture in the pot while she 



chanted ..." eye of newt, tail of 
aboriginian squirrel, nasal hair of 
hairy nose wombat . . . . " After 
considerable stirring, she an- 
nounced that it was ready, ex- 
plaining that it was a special reci- 
pe that would make him regain 
his strength. The boy grew nau- 
seous at the thought of eating 
such a concoction, but to be po- 
lite, he took a spoonful and swal- 
lowed it with great difficulty. To 
his relief, it didn't taste bad at all. 
In fact its taste was similar to 
chicken soup. He spent that night 
before the warm fire with the el- 
ves and Mother Tums, listening 
to tales of the forest and smoking 
from a pipe filed with sweet smel- 
ling herbs, making him feel 
strange but peaceful. When his 
turn came to tell a story, he told 
them of a dream that he felt was 
responsible for being where he 
was .... 




"One night while fast asleep I 
dreamed I was sitting on a limb 
outside my window. Below me 
there were two women and three 
men. They called themselves the 
Council of Tips, and explained 
that soon my test would deter- 
mine if I was worthy of manhood. 
While I listened, they told me 
that when the time came, I would 
have to find the Golden Fleece. 
The Council would not explain 
what it was, but they said I must 
have courage and faith to get it." 

When he finished his story, his 
hosts were smiling, but they told 
him not to worry about his 
strange dream, for they had 
known others who had the same 
dream. Assured, the boy quickly 
fell asleep. During the following 
morning, he was taught the ways 
of the forest, and sent on his way. 
Before he departed, they told him 
to follow a nearby river to a stone 
abbey. There he would find the 
Deacon, who would help him in 



his quest. The elf Kool, gave him 
a box which contained magic dust 
that had the ability to create an 
image on water which would 
guide him in time of need. The 
boy followed the river until he 
came upon a fork in the path. 
Not knowing which way to go, he 
remembered Kool's advice, and 
sprinkled the dust into the rush- 
ing water. A hazy image materi- 
alized in the wake. Although it 
was vague, it did tell him which 
stream to follow. After making 
his way along the marshy bank, a 
journey that seemed to take for- 
ever, he came upon the small 
stone abbey. The surrounding 
yard was dotted with tiny beds of 
flowers. He entered the abbey, 
noticing many monks huddled a- 
round tables studying thick 
books. As he looked around him, 
he was taken aback by the incred- 
ible amount of literature crowd- 
ing the walk. He approached a 
nearby monk and whispered. 



"Can you tell me where I can 
find the Deacon?" 

In the middle of his inquiry, he 
was startled by a low melodic 
voice that echoed endlessly off 
the stone walls, booming, "Si- 
lence, you sniveling knave! Who 
are you to waltz in here and dis- 
rupt this learning environment? 
How do you justify your meager 
existence?" 

The boy began, "I have come 
from the Land of Botonia, where 
I met Mother Tums. I am in 
search of the Golden Fleece and 
have been told that you might be 
able to help me." 

The Deacon answered, "My 
son, I cannot tell you how to find 
the Golden Fleece. You must do 
that for yourself, although I will 
help guide you in the right direc- 
tion. When you have gained the 
knowledge you must attain, there 
will be no ceremony, I will just 
say go!" 



The boy spent many long 
nights educating himself in the 
many aspects of philosophy, re- 
ligion, and culture. While study- 
ing books on geography, he learn- 
ed the fastest route over the great 
Mountains of Irony. 

His stay complete, the boy set 
off towards the mountains. While 
hiking through the dense under- 
bush of the forest, the boy was 
taken by surprise by a band of 
soldiers from the army of Phized. 
They were clad in red loincloths 
and blazing white shirts, golden 
emblems shining. He was sur- 
rounded by them with their 
weilding huge spears menacingly 
pointed in his direction. Without 
a word, they brought him to their 
leader, General Sputnick, who at 
the time was reprimanding a sol- 
dier for not having his uniform in 
proper order. "To the Gallows!" 
he bellowed. Turning to face the 
new arrival he said: "Well son 



you've come to join my army of 
supporters." 

"No sir," the lad replied meek- 
ly, "I am in search of the Golden 
Fleece. Can you help me?" 

The General ignored the boy's 
question and continued in his 
train of thought, stating. "Good 
then! We'll commence with the 
initiation which consisted of hav- 
ing his face dunked in a hot 
stream and all the hair on his legs 
removed. The extradition is 
brought about by using a stinky 
fiber from a rare Scotch tree 
found only in the mystic valley. 
Suddenly, the sentry shouted, 
proclaiming that the Rockyland 
army had begun attacking them. 
With the battle raging the boy es- 
caped into the woods during the 
confusion. 

He ran and ran until he found 
a dark cave in which he could 
seek refuge. As he tried to catch 
his breath, he heard scuffling be- 



hind him. Turning he saw four 
glowing eyes piercing through 
the darkness. In his terror he 
fainted. 

Coming to, he realized that he 
had been tied to a stylagmite be- 
fore a large fire, overwhich his 
adversary, a huge green creature 
with two heads and a dragon-like 
tail. The creature spoke, "We are 
the Brothers Kirkenov. You have 
strayed into our home and you 
shall become our evening meal!" 

After a brief pause, they began 
to argue childishy over what part 
of him each of them would eat. 
One of them started, "If you get 
the arms and ribs, I get the legs 
and head." 

"But I want the feet!" 

"But the feet are the best part 
of the legs!" 

"OK, I'll take the legs and you 
get the arms." 

"No, I want the legs!" 



They argued on and on. Sud- 
denly, from a nearby corner of 
the cave, a strange St. Bernard 
wearing glasses appeared. It ap- 
proached the boy, unnoticed by 
the bickering brothers, and gnaw- 
ed away his ropes until they were 
severed. Together, they sneaked 
away quietly. The dog led them 
to a large man waiting outside. 
The man explained that he was 
Zoba the Bleak, and that he had 
heard of the boy's capture by the 
dreaded Brohters Kirkjenov, Zo- 
ba told the boy of a grand Prince 
who dwelled in the foothills of the 
Mountains of Irony. He explain- 
ed that there they would be wel- 
comed and get rest. He also re- 
vealed that he knew of the boys 
search for the Golden Fleece and 
would help him in his search. 
Finally feeling secure, the lad fol- 
lowed St. Bernard and Zoba 
down a narrow path which led to 
the castle of the Master of Tyr- 
anny. 

The castle was massive, with 



four cylinder shaped turrets 
standing tall at each corner. 
Flags waved grandly at the top of 
each. Upon passing through the 
first gate, they were greeted by 
the sight of lavish gardens and 
magnificent fountains. All the 
while Zoba the Bleak spewed out 
his theories on existence and the 
philosophy of life. 

A servant led the boy to his 
chamber where he lathered and 
made ready for the night's feast. 
Once inside the splendid dining 
hall, he was amazed at the huge 
crystal chandeliers and the enor- 
mous oak table, which seated at 
least thirty people. The table at 
which he seated was crowded 
with lords and ladies of great 
wealth and power. After a short 
wait, a herald announced the ar- 
rival of the Master of Tyranny, 
and all arose. Through an intri- 
cately carved archway waddled a 
short, greying man, dressed gaily 
in the finest satins and silks. He 
stood for a moment at the head of 



the table. As if given a signal, 
everyone sat down and began to 
consume an incredible meal. Af- 
terwards, when everyone's appe- 
tite was satisified, the Prince be- 
gan a garralous speech with, 
"My friends, first of all, I would 
like to express my extreme grati- 
tude for your presence here to- 
night. On a recent excretory to 
the great province of Maharishi 
Manure, I had the chance to con- 
verse with the wise Manure him- 
self, an uncle of my compatriate 
Zoba the Bleak. We discussed at 
length the idiosyncratic relation- 
ship between the voluminous so- 
lemnity of the aspiring sphenoid 
and the playfooted orifice of an 
extortianate exureinate. However 
this contrasted greatly with the 
prenotion that all pedagogues 
clouded in the deglutinating of 
probosidious. Do not let this de- 
lude your perspicacity of mulier 
balbriggans, for if you relegate 
them . . . . " 




The Master of Tyranny ram- 
bled on late into the night. When 
the bells in the tower struck four 
all had retired with the exception 
of the Prince and Zoba the Bleak, 
who bantered on until sunrise. 

At mid-morning, after a deli- 
cious brunch, the boy finally got 
a chance to meet the Master. He 
spoke at great length of the Gold- 
en Fleece, none of which the boy 
could understand. However, the 
Prince did send four nobles to ac- 
company him up to the peak of 
the Mountains of Irony. They 
could not go past the peak be- 
cause of the roaming band of 
rowdies, who were greatly 
feared. Their names were Sir 
Lanepaint, Sir Brownpot, Sir 
Nosegraph, and Mistress Sim- 
plepeninink. 

As evening closed in on the 
weary travelers, they decided to 
camp along the banks of a small 
stream. One by one, the nobles 
drifted into slumber, but hour af- 



ter hour passed and the boy failed 
to become drowsy as there were 
torrents of questions flooding his 
mind trying to discover where his 
journey would lead him. Finally, 
frustrated by his futile effort to 
sleep, the lad dressed and walked 
for awhile beside the whispering 
water. As he rounded a bend in 
the stream, he suddenly became 
aware of noises ahead of him. Be- 
fore he could react, he found 
himself confronted by a seething 
army of huge moles. They im- 
mediately converged on him, and 
without a word, carried him deep 
into the bush. They proceeded to 
a dark menacing castle with a 
thick, black wall, and a stone 
tower jutting up one side. The 
boy shuddered at this ominous 
sight before him and wailed in 
vain for help. The moles carried 
him through the gates and down 
a must stairwell to a sophisticated 
laboratory; where stood the lar- 
gest mole he had ever seen. The 



figure dressed in a white coat was 
brooding over a set of steaming 
test tubes and and boiling potions 
of brilliant color. The giant 
turned to him, twitched his 
whiskers violently for a moment, 
as if to sneeze, and reprimanded 
him saying, "Who are you boy? 
Why have you strayed into my 
territory? Do you have your pap- 
ers in order?" The boy shook his 
head timidly, not understanding. 
"Just as I thought!" roared the 
creature, "Assistants, take him to 
the tower at the fourteenth hour 
of this very day. We shall see how 
one so bold as this schmuck will 
fare against one of the great rid- 
dles concocted by the Barron of 
Cents!" He shrieked out a wicked 
cackle as the frightened boy was 
led away. 

INTERMISSION 



<5=r=?^ 




6==^^:=^ 




The two o'clock bells were ech- 
oed by the slam of the heavy oak- 
en door, sealing the lad high up in 
the tower. As his tearing eyes ad- 
justed to the scant light of the 
dark cell, the boy found that his 
only companion was an old man 
with a long beard and tangled 
hair. He was shackled to the wall, 
feet barely touching the dirt 
floor. The man called himself the 
Christian Son and told the boy of 
the many long years he had spent 
in the cell, pondering the Barron 
of Cents' riddle, and awaiting re- 
lease. 

Just then a loud click resound- 
ed off the walls as the cell door 
was unlocked and opened. The 
barron entered, accompanied by 
his sniveling assistant. Rocky 
from the Land of Magnesium. 
With a sardonic grin, he began to 
speak, saying "Take your time in 
answering this riddle boy. You'll 
have plenty of it at your dispos- 
al." A wicked smile spread over 
his face as he enjoyed every mo- 
ment of the boy's predicament. 
"Now listen carefully. It is in, on, 



and above the earth at all times. 
It drinks the nectar of the earth, 
and reaps the harvest of the sky. 
Good Luck! Ha Ha!" With that 
he and Christian Son are released 
and directed to a path that would 
reach the peak of the mountain. 

They spent the following day 
weaving through the rocky crags 
and thick underbrush. As night 
fell, they began to hear the faint 
sounds of singing and music 
through the trees ahead. Creep- 
ing closer, he could see a fiery 
glow that illuminated three 
young minstrels making merry- 
ment. 

Leaving Christian Son to go 
his way down the mountain, he 
boldly entered the campsite, feel- 
ing he had nothing to fear. He 
then introduced himself and ex- 
plained his goal. They told him to 
forget his troubles and stay with 
them as they were decending the 
mountain also and would take 
him to Gingham Heights, a small 
village at the base. They intro- 
duced themselves as Sir George 
of Murky, Lord Henly VIII and 



Sir Steven of Basin. They spent 
the night singing gay songs and 
drinking golden ale. 

The next day while traveling, a 
near tragedy occured. Luckily 
Lord Henly VIII spotted the fer- 
ocious IronSides beetle charging 
in their direction. They quickly 
darted into the woods and waited 
in hiding until the black-maned 
menace had passed. 

As the ground leveled off the 
tiny band began to spot the stee- 
ples and rooftops of Gingham 
Heights. As the small band enter- 
ed the town the villagers gave 
them suspicious looks. The min- 
strels said that it was always that 
way and that the boy shouldn't be 
bothered by it. They approached 
the center of the town and split 
up, the minstrels explained they 
were going to the Viceroy of Vic- 
tory's house since he payed them 
well for entertainment. Sir Steven 
of Basin suggested that the boy 
go to Micky Dee's Tavern, the 
usual gathering place for the 
younger people in the town. 



The boy located the tavern and 
ordered a glass of ale. While 
looking around he took in all the 
strange people. There were three 
different looking characters sit- 
ting around a mushroom. The 
Little Miss was screaming Spin- 
ach to The Dull Mister who was 
throwing Germs to Black Barth 
who was eating Frenchies. It was 
a sight seeing the hands and 
mouths going all over the place 
and no listening to the other. 
While this was going on there 
was another group playing with a 
monster that kept printing ER- 
ROR on its forehead in red let- 
ters. The Chief Meter kept shak- 
ing his head as Laplenty and 
Youngson kept pushing the 
wrong buttons. Neither accepting 
help from the Bough of Holly. In 
another area there were a weird 
collection of people sitting a- 
round a big man in a railroad car. 
They appeared to be listening to 
the bad jokes of Buzz Bowling- 
back. It began to get noisy, every- 



one was talking, there was no way 
to discover what was being said. 
There appeared to be no sense so 
with nothing to do he ordered 
another ale and another and 
another until he became aware of 
silence. He looked around and 
discovered all had passed out and 
all that remained were the empty 
steins and soggy pipes. A single 
bar maid was left cleaning the 
counter and sweeping around the 
patrons. She looked over and spi- 
ed the boy sitting alone and look- 
ing dejected. Going over to him 
she inquired what was wrong. He 
began to tell his trials of obtain- 
ing the quest making a great ef- 
fort to keep back the tears. 

As he finished, the girl took 
him by the hand and told him to 
forget it all and come with her to 
the seaside where all the young 
people went to drink and have ro- 
mance. He followed Charity to 
her place. 

He woke up the next day and 
looked into a mirror. His face 



looked lean and mature; his baby 
fat was gone. Chastity had 
taught him a great deal about 
getting the Golden Fleece. Wish- 
ing to rejoin the minstrels, the 
young man bade Chastity fare- 
well and crossed the commons to 
the estate of the Viceroy of Vic- 
tory. When he arrived he found 
that the minstrels had gone on 
their way earlier that morning. 
However The Viceroy knew of 
the lads quest and subsequently 
had set up a meeting for him with 
a panel of the wisest people in the 
village. Assembled in the confer- 
ence room were the Knight Grop- 
er, Madame Myth, Mayor Vali- 
um, The Minister of Grass, Ma- 
dame Gustofwind, and of course 
the Viceroy. Although much 
time passed in the conference, it 
was soon clear to the young man 
that these men knew no more a- 
bout the Golden Fleece than he 
did. So amist good-byes, he left 
the village at noon. 




'Qjg^itm^ 




As he passed through the gates 
of the town, he was approached 
by an old white haired woman 
who asked him of his searching 
for the Golden Fleece. The lad 
was startled, "How did you 
know?" he inquired. The His- 
torian said she had seen many go 
through the gates looking for the 
Golden Fleece. "Tell me how I 
can find it." He said to her and 
she replied, "Think of all that has 
been said from the time he en- 
countered Master Tyranny and 
left the Viceroy. Taking the ad- 
vice he continued his journey. 
The combination of his weariness 
and thinking he lost the way and 
ended up on the banks of the riv- 
er. 

Following the river led him 
back to the Barron's castle where 
he was rejoined with Christian 
Son. Fearing that they would be 
discovered they decided to hide 



until night. Before they could set- 
tle the Barron and his assistants 
were upon them*. The Baron smil- 
ed but his victory was short lived. 
At that moment the boy yelled 
out, "I have the answer." The 
Barron's jaw dropped as the boy 
continued, "There is but one 
thing on this earth that could fit 
the riddle, the TREE of course!" 
Hearing the correct answer, 
the Barron stromed away in a 
rage, stopping momentarily to in- 
form the boy that he is to be tak- 
en back to the castle and is to 
scour every inch of the castle wall 
before he is allowed to leave. Sit- 
ting in the castle, totally discour- 
aged, the boy snatched the box of 
magic dust from his pocket and 
sprinkled it into a bowl of water 
on a wodden table. The image ap- 
peared loud and clear; yet it 
spoke in riddles: 

"When the bright eye of 



midnight 
Casts its glance upon me, 
The reflection will hold 

the key. 
For freedom is yours this 

very night 
When one looks in the 
shadow of thee," 
The boy sat anxiously awaiting 
the moon's rising light. At the 
stroke of midnight a beam of 
light projected through the bars 
and reflected off the bowl of 
water and shown brightly in the 
boy's eyes. The Christian Son 
gasped, as he saw a Golden Vial 
glistening in a crack in the wall 
beneath the boys' shadow. Chris- 
tian Son yelled, "Drink it my son 
and make your escape while you 
can!" 

After drinking the liquid he be- 
gan to feel strange, as if 



B 



the room was growing. Christian 
Son stared disbelieving, as the 
boy shrank to a size no larger 
than a man's shoe. Bidding fare- 
well to his friend, he made his 
way to the barred window and 
climbed down the ivy-covered 
wall. Upon landing in the moat, 
he regained his normal size. He 
found his way through the rocks 
until he spotted the four nobles 
who were his quide at the Moun- 
tain of Irony. They gave him the 
colors to make the water create 
an image. He took the colors 
and dropped some into the moat. 



The image appeared which 
startled him because it was his 
own. It spoke saying to trust his 
own image and dive into the 
raging water. The current pulled 
him under, he spun and twisted. 
As he was gasping for air, he 
wondered if his image had be- 
trayed him; had he betrayed him- 
self? Just as he was about to give 
up he surfaced abruptly. Sput- 
tering and chocking, he cleared 
his eyes and looked around. He 
was in the middle of a small pond 
surrounded by people of his own 
age. They seemed to be marching 



in single file stopping slightly 
and continuing on. As he climbed 
out of the water and caught 
his breath an imposing figure 
handed him a small Golden 
Tassle, congratulating him on a 
job well done. 

Even if he had not actually 
received a Fleece, only a Tassle, 
he felt that somewhere along the 
way he had gotten that too. 
And with that, he hopped into 
his fuel-injected, overhead cam 
'78 Chevy and raced off into 
the sunset 




If You Care About Price 



HINGHAM PHARMACY 



100 Derby Street 
Next To Stop & Shop. 



HOI 

"At 

ActI 

470 No. Fra 
Holbrook, M 
767-1887 

Ai 


JSE OF CGRRECl 

inique hair cutting stu 

Act II 

nklin Street 400 LInco 

ass. HIngham, 

767-4987 749-9603 

Act III 

Sheridan Street 
Marshfield Plaza 
Marshfield, Mass. 
834-9739 

Jnisex Haircutting Studi 


noN 

dio" 

In Street 
Mass. 

749-9741 




Telephone 740-2260 

RESTAURANT AND GIFT SHOP 

1217 Main Street 
hingham. mass. 02043 



Q 



Congratulations 

To The Class Of 

"78" 

May Success Be 
Yours 

42 Whiting St. So Hingham 749-2262 




Bingham 
Institution 
FOROavings 



INCOKrOK«TE0 III4 



55 Main St., Hingham, IMa. • 749-2200 

Central Street Drive-in • 749-0209 

788 Wasliington St., Hanover, Ma. •826-5151 

401 Nantasl(et Ave., Huii, Ma. • 925-2600 

Deposits Insured in Full Under Massachusetts Law 



STEVE 
MEHLS 




BOAT HOUSE 

NEW ENGLAND 

SAIJNG HEADQUARTERS 

HIGH PERFORMANCE IS OUR SPECIALTY 



Rt 3 A Rotnrv 

Hmgham Harbor, Mass 02.043 

(617) 749 2898 



Hingham Office .... Serving 

All Of Plymouth County And Cohasset, 

749-4433 

Hingham Harbor 

Professional Building 



5i 



U NHEMAM & CO., loc 

REALTORS 



Established 1929 



P^ 



SmnU S OEGAHIC 




^ -- ^^-^ 



71 HOSTH STBKT 



THE HINGHAM CARPET SHOP 



Sales - Installation 
Armstrong - Mohawk - Downs 

Kitchens & Vanities By Farina 

148 North St. Hingham 

749-9400 

8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday - Friday 
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday 



BOTTLED LIQUORS - DOMESTIC & IMPORTED WINES 



ACCORD PACKAGE STORE 

Queen Anne's Corner 
Hingham. Mass. 



GEORGE H. SCOTHORNE 749-9665 



FREDERICK M. SHAW. INC. 



427 LINCOLN STREET 
HINGHAM. MASS. 02043 



Frederick M. Shaw 



749-2016 



749-1617 




OLD COLONY 
TENNIS CLUB 



Hingh;ini Club: 

100 Rcercaiion Park Road 
Soulh Hingham, Mass. 02043 
749-4100 



Pembroke Club: 
Oak Sirccl 

Pembroke, Mass. 02.1.';9 
826-6306 



Accord Auto Supply 

100 Derby Street 
Hingham Plaza 
Hingham, Mass. 

Nationally Advertised, 
Branded Auto Parts & Accessories 

for all Passenger Cars & Trucks 

8:00 a.m. lo .'^:30 p.m. Monday - - Friday 
8:00 a.m. lo 5:00 p.m. Saturday 



871-3010 
749-0404 



*Special F.vents 
*Chailenging Ladder 
*Round robins 
*Team Tennis 



*Flighi Tennis 
*Conlraetual Time 
*Rceiproeal Membership 
*.lunior Program 



iBOi*^' 



p. □. Box 2D, HiNGHAM, Mass. 02043 



BEE 




Bare Cove Electrical 
Const. Co., Inc. 



749-3606 



RUSSELL K. MCLDUD 



'UNDER THE BUTTONWOOD' 

MOBIL SERVICE AND REPAIR 

TIRES - BATTERIES • ACCESSORIES 

Tel. 749-0894 ^ 274 Main St. 

HINGHAM, MASS. 



BOAT TOPS - AUTO TOPS 

CUSHION & COVERS REPAIRED ■ MADE TO ORDER 

COMPLETE INTERIORS 

Bl(^. #17 Boat Top 

and 

Hingham Auto Top 

Tel. 749-9878 



Hingham inoustriai. Center 
Rt. 3A Hingham, Mass., 02043 



"Bill" O'Keepe 




AtOM 

Chinese & Polynesian Restaurant 

198 Whiting St., Rte. 53, So. Hingham, Ma.02043 
Exit 29 S. E. Expressway 
749-6957 



Luncheon •Cocktails -Dinner- Banquet Facilities 
Catering Service & Take-outs 



TRY OUR SPECIALTIES 

Anyone who tmtes them once will 
always remember them. 

HINGHAM HOUSE OF PIZZA 

DO YOU WANT FASTER SERVICE? 

PHONE 749-6779 

WE WILL HAVE IT READY FOR YOU 

HINGHAM PLAZA 
TOO DERBY ST. HINGHAM, MASS. 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 

FARRAR PRINT SHOP 
PAXTON, MA. TEL. 7e»-9874 



REAL ESTATE on the South Shore 




I CUBBIEHScSCHELLEI 




321 Main Street, Hingham, Mass. 
Tel. 749-4060 



MLS 



WALSH & PACKARD INC. 

31 Main Street 
Hingham, Mass 



THE HINGHAM 



Co-operative Banlc 

71 Main Street 

749-0414 



H INGHAM JEWELERS 



54 South Street 
749-2108 



BEST WISHES 

NEW ENGLAND SEALCOATING 

CO. INC. 



YE OLDE MILL GRILLE 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 
CLASS OF 1978 

RUSSELECTRIC 



BEST WISHES 



j ?c/>catt 



Macaulay's Pharmacy, Inc. 



Just Off Queen 
Anne'i Corner 

Route S3 



749-4099 



SICKROOM SUPPLIES 

SUVINS YOU StVEN DAYS A WECK 

INCLUDINS HOLIDAYS 



SOUTH HINGHAM 



HINGHAM LOBSTER 
POUND 



G 



LASS HOUSE 



Domestic and imported China, Crystal, 

Lamps, Dinnerware and Gifts 

BRIDAL REGISTRY 



Queen Ann's Corner 
route S3 

HINGHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



749-2200 



Congratulations to the 
class of 1978 



CHASE 

ASSOCIATES/REALTORS 

»9-4300 



230 Gardner St. 



Compliments of 




Hingham, Massachusetts 

and 
Duxbury, Massachusetts 



A 




IROCKLANDI 

TRUST COMPANY 



SI RVK \ 

. ISANK . 



THERE IS A CONVENIENT ROCKLAND TRUST 
OFFICE NEAR YOU ON THE SOUTH SHOREI 

MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATlONi 





IPOCKLANOI 
TRUST COMPANY 

THERE IS A CONVENIENT ROCKLAND TRUST 
OFFICE NEAR VOU ON THE SOUTH SHOREI 

|mi;mbi;K ii:di;kal di;posit inshranc i corpokationI 



^- 1 






fit n 




<l \\ 1 








Ufe bI - 




1\ I'i. \ 


» 



Compliments 

GUILD CRAFT 



GOOD LUCK 
From 

WHIPPLE 
MOTORS INC. 

Dodge in Hingham 

Rte. 3A 
Hingham, Mass. 

749-2360 




PA 
DODGE - 




NNOLLY 
RPHY STUDIOS 






"WmmrM 



INSURANCE ESTIMATES - FOREIGN & DOMESTIC - TOWING 




^ ATft /i*tt» SiuC^ 



COMPLETE AUTO BODY REPAIRS 



MIKE McGANN 
749-3627 



74 NORTH ST. (REAR) 
HINGHAM, MASS. 02043 




.HlNOHAM RlDINS STABLE 

Orr RauTE 22S at lcavitt Strkkt 
TuRKCV Hikt Lank. H>moham 



HQRICS RCNTCD 
■OUGHT «i SOLO 



749-9734 



BEQINNCRS WELCOME 

Joe Saponaro 



TRAIL RIOINO 
GRO'iO RATCB 



749'2041 



Best Wishes Class Of '78 
From 



SPENCER PRESS INC. 



STAINLESS STEEL 

Fasteners 

Fittings 

Valves 

Pipe 

Tubing 

Hardware 

Specials 

Fabrications 

Flagpoles 




75 



RESEARCH ROAD 

Phone 617/749-7100 



INC. 

HINGHAM, MA 02043 

TWX 710-348-6494 



Cable "ALSTAINLES" U.S.A. 



IF IT'S MADE OF STAINLESS STEEL, CALL ALL-STAINLESS 

WHAT YOU WAIMT — WHEN YOU WANT IT— WHERE YOU WANT IT 



RIETZL 




A PLACE WHERE 
QUALITY SALES & 
SERVICE MEET 
on the South Shore 

SALES, 

SERVICE, 

PARTS 

& LEASING 

59 Pond Street Norwell 
871-0777 479-4500 





The Audi 5000 




THE WHITNEY GORDANS 



39 Main St. 

Hingham Ma. 02043 

749-0690 

Watch-Jewelry-Silver Repair 



GREG HALL 
ASSOCIATES 



m 

REALTOR ' 



Residential • Commerical • Industrial 

24 North Street — Hingham, Mass. 
Tel. (617) 749-3405 

Carol Regan • Ann Lethan 
Lee Yule • Charles Thomas 

Multiple Listing Service 




174 



THE EDITORS & STAFF THANK 




EDITORS-IN-CHIEF Tom Casey 

Cecilia Lutz 
Chris Caton, LAY-OUT EDITOR 
Alicia Ernst, SENIORS EDITOR 
Doug Calnan, PICTURE EDITOR 
Tom Patch, BOY'S SPORTS EDITOR 
Jan Shaw, GIRL'S SPORTS EDITOR 
Kim Alger, BUSINESS EDITOR 
Tom Norton, STATISTICS EDITOR 
Johnese Sullivan, CLUB EDITOR 
Leslie Warden, SUBSCRIPTIONS EDITOR 
Brenda Hickey, COPY EDITOR 
Jeff Marcus, LITERARY EDITOR 
Ted Doyle, LITERARY EDITOR 

STAFF E. Gray, T. Ricci, S. Deems, W. Brown, D. 
Collins, R. Lyons, E. Marx, L. Battista, L. Power, 
K. Shea, D. Kennedy, M. Koonce, A. Kost, D. 
Paul, B. Ribaudo, C. Richards, A. Sholler, M. 
Thibault, M. Anderson 

Contributing Photographers: 
Mr. Caton 
Tom Aitken 
Ernie Marx 



SPONSORS: 

Linda & Earl Alger 
Mr. & Mrs. William H. Anderso 
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Angeramo 
Dr. & Mrs. Philip Arena 
Bob & Gun Ayers 
Mr. & Mrs. Alfred J. Balerna 
Dr. & Mrs. Sam P. Batista 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert F. Bennett 
Jere Birkenfeld 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph D. Buckley 
:, Dr. & Mrs. Norman T. Budde 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Caira 
Dr. & Mrs. Arthur Calnan 
David C. Cardoni 
Mr. & Mrs. John G. Casagrande 
Mr. & Mrs. John M. Casey Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. J. Earle Caton 
Goodluck Class '78 Love Chester 
Mr. & Mrs. James L. Childs 
Bob & Helen Clabault 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert P. DeWitt 
James P. & Shirley Doherty 
Mr. & Mrs. Alan H. Deems 
Mr. & Mrs. Raymond R. Dwyer 
Mr. & Mrs. Hollis Ellis 



OUR FRIENDS 



Mrs. George E. Engdahl 

Feitelberg's 

A Friend 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Gallo 

Mr. & Mrs. William A. Gray III 

Mrs. Diane Hamon 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Hennessey 

Dr. & Mrs. Russel Henriksen 

Mr. & Mrs. James Leonard 

Charlotte & Bill Levin 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul H. Linscott, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. David Lundquist, Sr. 

Capt. & Mrs. Paul A. Lutz 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter B. Lyon 

Mr. & Mrs. Alfred F. Lyons 

Mr. & Mrs. John McGrath 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles E. Mansfield 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael E. Moffa 

Mr. & Mrs. David P. Murphy 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Murphy 

Dr. & Mrs. Richard Norton 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. O'Keefe 

The Peraino Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Power 



Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Puleo 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas L. Regan, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas L. Regan, Jr. 

Mary and Jerry Romano 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph A. Ryan 

RY-CO CORPORATION 

Mr. & Mrs. Elliot N. Taylor. 

John & Astrid Thomas 

Mr. & Mrs. F. Troiano 

Dr. & Mrs. Elliot Schiffman 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerald T. Shaw 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Shaw Jr. 

The Southwick's 

Mr. & Mrs. John A. Stoddard 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Warden 

The Waughs 

Mr. & Mrs. James W. Wheaton 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur M. Whish 

PATRONS COLONY RUG; 

Mr. & Mrs. Yacobian 
SOUTH SHORE WOMAN'S 
EXCHANGE 
HINGHAM OPTICAL 
SHOPPE